COMICS BUYER’S GUIDE #1636 (December 2007)

DC continues to build towards 2008’s Final Crisis and Comics Buyer’s Guide #1636 examines one of the major elements of that upcoming event with a look at this fall’s Salvation Run mini-series. It all starts with a cover featuring villains of the DC universe by Joe Corroney.

Also in this issue:

There’s even more from DC, including exclusive interviews with new Wonder Woman writer Gail Simone and Countdown‘s Adam Beechen. Captain Comics also contributes to the DC mix with a Q&A with The Highwaymen creators Marc Bernardin and Adam Freeman.

Larry Hama shares his G.I. Joe experiences and looks at his latest Devil’s Due project.

Mr. Silver Age tests your Silver Age knowledge with his annual Trivia Quiz!

George Nelson visits with Funky Winkerbean creator Tom Batiuk on his latest storline.

Michelle Nolan looks at a trio of teen titles.

Plus, we have a slate of reviews of comics, trade paperbacks, videos, and other comics-related materials!

And Peter David presents his Skrull test.

All this and more, plus the largest and most complete monthly price guide in comics.

It’s all in Comics Buyer’s Guide #1636, shipping now!

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12 Responses to COMICS BUYER’S GUIDE #1636 (December 2007)

  1. fresco says:

    Whatta great idea for a cover. It’s fun to see all those bad guys (and bad girls) all in one place like that.

    :::insert thumbs up icon here:::

  2. pageturner says:

    I had a few moments to spare this evening, and I reminisced a bit. I thought back to my youth, and thought back to last month.

    Last month, my subscription issue of CBG arrived late, but arrived nonetheless. So, this week, I got the jump on things by about a month, by just downloading the online edition and reading through it.

    Then I thought about last month again.
    I had posted a suggestion to improve the usefulness of the CBG Comics Birthday page. “Would you consider, when you are listing the birthday of a person who has died, either printing their name in italic, or perhaps as an alternative, listing their birth and death year, such as: Harvey Kurtzman (1924-1993)?”

    I had posted this so late in the month, I didn’t hear many comments, but one person seconded my suggestion and went on to add constructive comments. What do others think?

    Then, my thoughts returned to the present issue, where I had read Beau Smith’s excellent tribute to John Romita Sr.
    So well written.

    It “whisked” me back to my youth, when I had, like Beau, followed the drawings of the comic artists of the 60’s. Since mine were mostly from DC comics, it was years until I knew their names. But I knew their work. Curt Swan, Irv Novick, and many many more.

    uh. My evening’s spare time was up.

    But THEN I thought of the future.
    Maybe CBG could offer the option of a ‘pdf version only’ subscription. No printing or mailing fees! Cheaper! Faster!
    It would be an option for people like me, who live where the paper version arrives weeks and weeks after the online version is already available.

    Then I thought of… ah, ’til next month.

    Alan Spinney

  3. Mr. Silver Age says:

    I see that TwoMorrows has begun offering some of its magazines as electronic versions at a discount, so it’s not an impossibility that it could happen here. Actually, I’d think it would be more likely, as the TM magazines are more reference-oriented, either to history or how-to stuff, so they’d be more likely to be kept for future reference than CBG’s more timely material. So if there’s an audience for that stuff on-line, the same might be true for CBG.

    Needless to say, I can’t imagine why anyone wouldn’t want a hard copy of CBG so they can retain those Ask Mr. Silver Age columns to pull out and chuckle over at any time, without the need to be near a computer. But I suppose there are people like that.

    — Craig Shutt

  4. Hoy Murphy says:

    >Needless to say, I can’t imagine why anyone wouldn’t want a hard copy of CBG so they can retain those Ask Mr. Silver Age columns to pull out and chuckle over at any time, without the need to be near a computer. But I suppose there are people like that.<

    I’d be much happier if we could get those columns collected in another book or three. I like to be able to chuckle at any time. It’s been too long since Baby Boomer Comics came out, and I want more.

    –your pal, Hoy

  5. tardisrider says:

    I agree that printable downloadable subscriptions would be great. I get my comics and CBGs from Mile High Comics, but since I’m in South Korea everything is delayed at least a month.

    I’m expecting my order with CBG #1635 any day now!

    While I love reading CBG in its “real” form, having digital copies at the same time would be a great boon…and help me plan future comics orders in a timely fashion.

    Oh, and of course, I’d never fail to read Mr. Silver Age, file a copy of the print out and back up the files on 3 of my hard drives. Couldn’t do without words of wisdom from the one and only Mr. Silver Age!

    Roger Gray
    Seoul, S. Korea

  6. gservo says:

    This Was my first issue, i think i am will be getting a subscription soon ^_^

  7. Hoy Murphy says:

    I took Mr. Silver Age’s quiz in this issue and missed a disappointing 33 out of 96. I’m so ashamed. I did especially poorly with the real/imaginary/hoax categories. I need to read more Showcase Presentses so I can do better next year.

    –your pal, Hoy

  8. Mr. Silver Age says:

    It would be worth your while to study up on those Hoax/Dream/Imaginary Story categories, Hoy. They get a good audience reaction, so I’ve expanded on them in recent years. Plus, those comics a lot of fun to read, even if the story does turn out to be one of those things when you wish it wasn’t.

    They’re strange questions, though, since there are only four possible answers, and one of them (Imaginary Story) doesn’t happen for many characters beyond the Superman Family. Not many others even had dreams, although there are occasional ones, certainly. The beauty of the Superman titles is that any story has an equal chance of being any of the four!

    There is one glitch in the quiz write-up which made it tough to get one question right. The question for #1 in Villainous Crossovers asks for the additional super-hero besides Batman that Professor Hugo Strange battled. In fact, I’d written “Professor Hugo” and somehow the word “Strange” got added on in the editing process. That’s a much more difficult question, because Hugo Strange didn’t battle anyone else.

    I *should* have given his full name of Arnold Hugo, but I think of him as “Professor Hugo” and didn’t think to add it in.

    Ironically, someone wrote to me to point this out and referred me to the back-in-print Mike Fleischer Batman Encyclopedia for the facts. Sadly, the encyclopedia confuses things even more by listing him under “A” and calling him “Professor Arnold” in its reference to Detective Comics #306, reversing his name.

    So, indeed, when it comes to Professor Arnold Hugo, mistakes have been made. But not by me!

    BTW, the online version of #1637 has been up for a few days, although the preview of it isn’t posted here. Apparently, someone who usually posts these things is asleep at the switch.

    I hesitate to draw your attention to it, though, because the issue features this year’s Mopee Awards. And one of the recipients is featured prominently in your avatar.

    — Craig Shutt

  9. Hoy Murphy says:

    The quiz answer I questioned was the first appearance of Ka-Zar, which I had as the late 1930s pulp magazine with his name, or the first issue of Marvel Comics. But I guess since it’s a Silver Age quiz, the correct answer is X-Men 10.

    >>BTW, the online version of #1637 has been up for a few days, although the preview of it isn’t posted here. Apparently, someone who usually posts these things is asleep at the switch.< <

    I got my print copy in the mail today (11/20/07) so I didn’t have to try to read it on my computer screen the way Marvel expects me to pay to do.

    >>I hesitate to draw your attention to it, though, because the issue features this year’s Mopee Awards. And one of the recipients is featured prominently in your avatar.< <

    I should take umbrage at your Mopee award for the Ant-Man vs. the Protector story, but it really is silly, with the artwork not matching the script. Still, it’s really not any sillier than the story that introduced Egghead, in which gangsters hired a supposedly genius of a scientist to come up with a way to eliminate Ant-Man, and he came up with….flypaper. I believe you Mopeed that one previously, or maybe not. If CBG would do a collected Mopee edition of Baby Boomer Comics, it would be easier to reference.

    And I know you say later in the article that you like Atom more than Ant-Man, but I’m glad you saw fit to present Dr. Palmer with a Mopee of his own. Of the few Atom stories I’ve read, mostly in Showcase Presents, his stories are about as outlandish as Dr. Pym’s. After all, how much sillier is riding an ant than riding inside a telephone wire?

    –your pal, Hoy

  10. Brent Frankenhoff says:

    Zzzzzzzz … huh … wha’s tha, Mr. Silver Age?

    Oh, the preview of #1637.

    It’s up now. Click here.

  11. Mr. Silver Age says:

    >>But I guess since it’s a Silver Age quiz, the correct answer is X-Men 10.< <

    Yep, that’s the tricky mindset of a Mr. Silver Age trivia quiz. Once for a toss-up, which requires a fast, off-the-top-of-the-head response, I used the question, “By what other two identities do we better know…Nightwing?” The answer I got was “Robin and Dick Grayson,” which earned the panelist only a look of scorn (which was the plan).

    >>Still, it’s really not any sillier than the story that introduced Egghead, in which gangsters hired a supposedly genius of a scientist to come up with a way to eliminate Ant-Man, and he came up with….flypaper. I believe you Mopeed that one previously, or maybe not.< <

    No, it’s avoided a Mopee Award so far. Thanks for pointing it out to me, I’ll give it a look.

    >>If CBG would do a collected Mopee edition of Baby Boomer Comics, it would be easier to reference.< <

    That would be a slim volume. Still, I wish there were about 10,000 more fans like you, Hoy, as then there probably would be an entire library of Mr. Silver Age books on the shelf. But that doesn’t appear to be the case. Still, you never know what could happen.

    >> Of the few Atom stories I’ve read, mostly in Showcase Presents, his stories are about as outlandish as Dr. Pym’s. After all, how much sillier is riding an ant than riding inside a telephone wire?< <

    But that’s DC Science! It’s got both gobbledy and gook in just the proper formulation to make us think it actually works! How can you doubt it when a “scientist” like Ray Palmer says it works? I am shocked.

    — Craig Shutt

  12. Mr. Silver Age says:

    >>Zzzzzzzz … huh … wha’s tha, Mr. Silver Age? < <

    No worries here, Brent. We’re just directing people how to work around your befuddlement. Nothing new.

    It was just STRANGE, is all, just really STRANGE that the promo for the next issue wasn’t up yet. You don’t usually see things so STRANGE around here, but then things that are STRANGE will pop up when you (or at least I) least expect them to be so STRANGE. But I imagine you’re more used to STRANGE things, and so when you see something STRANGE pop up unexpectedly, it doesn’t seem so STRANGE to you.

    — Craig Shutt

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